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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:46 AM
HARRIS FAMILY
1. John<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1635, may have been identical to "my Negro man John" named in Thomas Whitehead's 6 April 1660 York County will by which he set John free, gave him all his wearing apparel and two cows, lent him as much land as he could tend himself, and appointed him guardian of his (Whitehead's) daughter if the court would permit it. On 11 September 1660 the court declared that John was a free man and ordered that the cattle and other things be delivered to him according to the will. On 28 October 1667 "John Harris, Negro" purchased from Robert Jones of Queen's Creek 50 acres in New Kent County adjoining Mr. Baker's and the main swamp by deed recorded in York County on 12 April 1669 [DWO 3:82, 89; 4:237].

Members of the Harris family who may have been descendants of John Harris were

<DIR>2 i. Martha<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1720.
3 ii. Solomon<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1722.
4 iii. James<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1723.
5 iv. Mary<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1729.
6 v. Edward<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1730.
7 vi. Martha<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1730.
8 vii. George<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1740.

<DIR>viii. Eleanor, born say 1732, living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 January 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind her "Mullatto" son Moses to Drury Stith, Gentleman [Orders 1751-3, 366].
ix. Martha<SUP>3</SUP>, born say 1733, married Joseph Hawley of Granville County, North Carolina.

</DIR>9 x. Phebe<SUP>1</SUP>, born about 1734.
10 xi. Nathan<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1735.

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2. Martha<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1720, was the mother of "a mulatto boy" named Charles Harris who was bound to Lewellin Eppes in Charles City County, Virginia, in August 1746 [Orders 1737-51, 420]. She was the ancestor of

<DIR><DIR>i. Charles<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1740, bound apprentice in August 1746.

</DIR>11 ii. ?____, born say 1744.
12 iii. ?Joan, born say 1752.

<DIR>iv. ?William, born say 1755, a deserter from Captain Thomas Massie's new recruits for the sixth Virginia Regiment. The 21 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette offered a reward for his return, describing him as: a mulatto fellow about five feet eleven inches high, the veins in his leg much broke, appear in knots, he was enlisted in New Kent, but expect he is lurking about Charles City [Virginia Gazette, Purdie's edition, p.3, col. 3].
v. ?Betty, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 13 July 1805: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet and a half inches high, forty five years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 336].

</DIR>13 vi. ?Edward<SUP>3</SUP>, born say 1760.

<DIR>vii. ?Richard, born say 1775, taxable on one tithe and a horse in Charles City County in 1800 [1800 Personal Property Tax List, p.11], head of a Charles City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959].

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:47 AM
3. Solomon<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1722, sued Abraham Morris in Charles City County court in July 1744 but failed to prosecute [Orders 1737-51, 311]. He was a tithable in Lunenburg County in the list of Lewis Deloney in the household of Thomas Evans in 1748 [Tax List 1748-52]. He was tithable in his own household in William Howard's list for 1749 and 1750, the 1751 list of Field Jefferson, and the 1764 list of Edmund Taylor Sunlight on the Southside[/I], 109, 142, 169, 252]. He and his wife Sarah and son William were 3 "Black" tithables in the 1765 Granville County, North Carolina list of Wm. Bullock. He was the father of

<DIR>14 i. ?Mary<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1750.

<DIR>ii. William, born about 1753, taxable in his parents' household in Wm. Bullock's Granville County list in 1765. He was married to Eady [B]Stewart by 11 September 1780 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered Zachariah Mallett to deliver up the will of her mother Patty Stewart, deceased, on the motion of William Harris and Eady his wife [Orders 1779-84, 76].

</DIR>15 iii. ?John, born say 1755.
16 iv. ?Phebe<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1755.

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4. James<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1723, was a "free Negro" who confessed in Charles City County court in February 1743/4 that he stole a small quantity of sugar from the store of James Rae. He was given fifteen lashes. George Minge paid his court fees [Orders 1737-51, 289]. He was taxable in Charles City County on a horse in 1790 (called James Harris, Sr.) but exempt from personal tax [1790 Personal Property Tax List, p.9], and he may have been exempt in 1783 when James Jr. was listed as a taxable. He made a 29 July 1784 Charles City County will by which he directed that his stock of sheep should be sold, his crop delivered to Abraham Brown, and the rest of his estate divided among his children, his son John Harris excepted. He named Abraham Brown executor (who died before him). The will was proved on 21 May 1791 by oath of Dixon Brown, a witness (making his mark). James Harris was granted administration on the estate on 50 pounds security [WB 1:55]. James, Sr.'s widow was apparently Frances Harris who was a witness to the 15 December 1791 Charles City County will of Sarah Brown (widow of Abraham). Frances left a 12 November 1803 Charles City County will, proved 19 June 1806. She left a bed and furniture to her grandson George Hunt Harris (son of Haly Harris) left son Chavis Harris and his wife Susanna all the rest of her estate excluding her wearing apparel, left grand daughter Rebecca Brown (daughter of John Brown) a spinning wheel and cards, left her wearing apparel to be divided among her daughter Susanna Brown (wife of Dixon Brown), Susanna's daughter, her granddaughter Celia Harris and Rebecca Brown (wife of Edward Brown). She named her son-in-law John Brown, Abraham Brown and William Brown executors. She made a codicil stipulating that her sons John and James Harris and her daughter Priscilla were to receive no more than one penny each [WB 1:650]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. John<SUP>4</SUP>, born say 1758, taxable in Charles City County from 1783 to 1814, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-7; 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958].

</DIR>17 ii. James<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1760.

<DIR>iii. Priscilla, born say 1765, wife of John Brown and mother of Rebecca Brown.
iv. Haly, born say 1770, father of George Hunt Harris who was called Hunt Harris when he was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

</DIR>18 v. Chavis, born say 1780.

<DIR>vi. Susanna, wife of Dixon Brown.
vii. ?Rebecca, wife of Edward Brown.

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5. Mary<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1729, a "mullato orphan," was living with Willing Wynne on 4 October 1734 when the vestry of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick County, Virginia, paid him to keep her until she reached the age of twenty-one [Hopkins, St. Andrew Parish Vestry Book, 41]. She may have been the daughter of Katherine Harris, (no race indicated), who was presented by the Prince George County court on 13 November 1739 for having a bastard child [Orders 1737-40, 362], perhaps the Katherine Harris who died before 10 October 1741 when Thomas Neuse was paid by the St. Andrew Parish Vestry of Brunswick County for making her coffin [Hopkins, St. Andrew Parish Vestry Book, 48]. Mary was called a "free Mulatto" on 15 December 1767 when the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her sons Nimrod and William to Peter Field Jefferson [Orders 1765-8, 450]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Nimrod, born say 1764, bound apprentice on 15 December 1767.
ii. William, born say 1766, bound apprentice on 15 December 1767.
iii. Catherine<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1767, bound to Peter Field Jefferson in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 11 November 1771 [Orders 1771-73, 84].
iv. James<SUP>3</SUP>, born about 1769, ordered bound apprentice to Benjamin Ferrell in Mecklenburg County on 9 December 1771 [Orders 1771-73, 135]. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 29 June 1812: This is to Certify that James Harris who was born & raised in the County of Mecklenburg & Commonwealth of Virginia, is a free man, he is five feet seven inches high, of a Colour but little removed from black, is about forty years old & has lost his upper fore teeth. The said James Harris was bound to, and Served his apprenticeship with Benjamin Ferrell, late of this County & Commonwealth aforesaid decd. where he has resided ever since, and has uniformly, as far as I recollect ever to have heard, supported a good Character [Register of Free Negroes, 1809-41, no. 4].

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6. Edward<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1730, had two taxables in his Granville County, North Carolina household in the list of Jonathan White in 1750 [CR 44.702.19]. He was called "negro" in the 1752-54 tax lists and in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 716]. In 1753 he was tithable but refused to pay tax for his wife, perhaps claiming she was white. She was the light-skinned daughter of William Chavis who made a deed of gift of 340 acres in Granville on the north side of Tabbs Creek to his "daughter Sarah Harris wife of Edward Harris" on 6 September 1756 [DB C:73]. Edward and Sarah were taxables with their children in all the extant Granville County colonial tax lists [CR 044.701.19]. In 1782 he was taxed on 190 acres, 4 horses, and 6 cattle in Fishing Creek District. His wife Sarah died in January 1785 according to the deeds of her oldest sons Gibson and Sherwood who sold their interest in her dower lands to John Penn, administrator of her estate [DB O:408, 423]. Penn divided the remaining 192 acres among her other two sons Jesse and Solomon on 13 March 1789 [WB 2:233]. In 1785 Edward or his son by that name was a buyer at the sale of an estate in Northampton County [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:50], and he was head of a Northampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72]. Edward and Sarah's children named in the tax lists and Sarah's 1789 Granville County bequest were

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:48 AM
<DIR><DIR>i. Amey, born about 1749, taxable in her parents' Epping Forest District household in 1761.
ii. Lucy, born about 1752, taxable in her parents household in Samuel Benton's list for Epping Forest District in 1764.
iii. Nancy, born about 1752, taxable in her parents household in Samuel Benton's list for Epping Forest District in 1764.
iv. Nelly, born about 1754, taxable in her parents household in the list of Stephen Jett in 1766.
v. Edward<SUP>2</SUP>/ Ned, born about 1756, taxable in the list of Jonathan Kittrell in 1768. He died before 14 July 1792 when his brother Gibson, as "Eldest Brother & heir at law to Edward Harris decd.," gave power of attorney to Philemon Hodges to receive his pay for service in the Revolution. His brothers, Sherwood and Solomon Harris, made a similar deposition confirming Gibson's statement on 22 July 1792 [NCGSJ X:111].
vi. Gibson, born about 1760, not mentioned in the tax lists but sold his share of land to John Penn on 5 July 1785, identifying it as the land which "William Chavers gave to his daughter Sarah, wife of Edward Harris" [DB O:408]. In the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns for Captain Abraham Potter's Company he was listed as a seventeen-year-old "black man," occupation: planter [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [NC:684].
vii. Sherwood, born say 1761, not mentioned in the tax lists but sold his share of his mother's land to John Penn on 24 December 1785 [DB O:423]. He was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:770] and 10 in Granville County in 1810 [NC:864].
viii. Jesse, born say 1762, not taxed in his father`s household, but named as Edward and Sarah's son in his brothers' 1785 deeds [DB O:408, 423]. He received half of his mother's land by the 1789 division of her estate [WB 2:233]. He was taxable in Granville County on 50 acres in 1789 and sold his farm animals in Granville County on 10 March 1791 [WB 2:225]. He married Elizabeth Ivey, 29 November 1790 Wake County bond. He was taxable on 100 acres in 1798 and was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 and 4 in 1810 [NC:864]. He was taxable on 200 acres in Beaverdam District of Granville County in 1805 (called "Jessee Harris of Colour") but was assessed only poll tax in 1808 (called F. Negro) [Tax List, 1803-09, 130, 271]. He may have been the Jesse Harris, about sixty years old on 21 February 1821, who made a declaration in Wake County court to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that by his first wife he had four children, one named Fennell (seventeen years old) living with him, and by his second wife a child Billy who was also living with him [NCGSJ XIII:34]. Perhaps his second marriage was to Julia Tabon (Taborn), 23 February 1820 Wake County bond, Thomas Roycroft bondsman.
ix. Solomon<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1767, named in his brothers' 1785 Granville County deeds [DB O:408, 423]. He received half his mother's remaining land by the 1789 division of her estate. He was taxable in Fishing Creek District of Granville County in 1796 on 103 acres and one poll and on 73 acres in 1798 [Tax List 1796-1802, 12, 73]. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

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7. Martha<SUP>2</SUP> Harris, born say 1730, was the mother of Isham Harris who was bound by the Lunenburg County court to Amos Tims, Jr. on 13 October 1763. She married John Stewart who died before 14 February 1765 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Parish to bind his orphan daughter Eleanor Steward to William Taylor [Orders 1763-4, 257; 1764-5, 2, 203]. Mecklenburg County was formed from St. James Parish later that year, and in September 1772 the Mecklenburg County court bound Eleanor to Molly Taylor [Orders 1771-73, 318]. On 27 April 1777 Martha's son Moses Stewart purchased 100 acres from Henry Jackson in Mecklenburg County on the south side of Allen's Creek adjoining Stephen Mallett, with Stephen and Zachariah Mallett as witnesses [DB 5:56]. She apparently purchased this land in his name since he was only ten years old at the time. Her 17 January 1779 Mecklenburg County, Virginia will, witnessed by Zachariah Mallett, was proved 9 October 1780 on motion of her executor, Henry Jackson. By her will she left her land to her son Moses and left livestock and money to her children Isham, Nelly, Edy, Fanny, Moses, Sinai, and Disea [WB 1:341]. She was counted as head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 persons in 1782, but this was probably the listing for her estate [VA:32]. Her estate included 54 acres of land which was sold for taxes in 1793 [DB 8:407-8]. Martha was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Isham Harris, born say 1756, called "Isham Harris, Son of Patty Stewart" on 13 October 1763 when he was ordered bound to Amos Tims, Jr., by the Lunenburg County court. On 13 April 1769 the court ordered Isham bound instead to John Evans (alias Eppes) [Orders 1763-64, 257; 1766-69, folio 202]. He was taxable in John Evans' Lunenburg County household in 1772 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 304]. He may have been the Isham Harris, a "Mulatto," who was presented by the Pittsylvania County court on 15 May 1797 for retailing liquor without a licence at a cabin on the land of Daniel Molley [Orders 1795-8, 319]. He was a "FN" taxable in Pittsylvania County in 1797 [PPTL 1782-97, frame 768]. He applied for a pension for services in the Revolution at the age of eighty-four years on 8 August 1843 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, stating that he was born in Charlotte County, Virginia, in 1759 and that he was drafted in Lunenburg County.

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10. George<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1730, was head of a household with his wife Catherine in the Oxford District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1761. On 6 February 1775 he purchased 144-1/2 acres in Granville County near John Tatom's line for 105 pounds [DB K:249]. In 1782 he was taxable in Granville County on 145 acres, 3 horses, and 12 cattle in Ragland's District. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 persons in the 1786 state census, and he was taxable in Granville on his land for the last time in 1789. His children were

<DIR><DIR>i. Mary, born say 1750, taxable in the Granville County household of her father George Harris in Samuel Benton's list for 1762 and 1764.
ii. ?Claiborn, born about 1766, head of a Wake County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:770], 11 in Stokes County in 1810 [NC:573], and 12 "free colored" in Stokes County in 1820 [NC:346]. He entered the NW:NW part of Section 34, Town 10, Range 5 in Marion Township, Owen County, Indiana, on 10 August 1836 and SW:SE of Section 28 on 8 February 1845 [Land Entry Book #1]. He sold the SW:SE part of Section 28 a month later on 4 March 1845 [DB 8:285]. He was head of an Owen County, Indiana, household of 3 "free colored," one of them a woman over one hundred years of age, in 1830 [IN:22] and 5 "free colored" in 1840 [IN:42]. In 1850 he was in household #167 of Marion Township, Owen County, Indiana. Perhaps one of his children was Hardin Harris, born about 1797, living next door to him in household # 168 in Marion Township.
iii. ?Hardy, born say 1772, married Polly Evans, 22 October 1793 Wake County bond, John Reighley bondsman. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:767]. He may have been the Hardy Harris who was head of a Abbeville District, South Carolina household in 1810 [SC:82].
iv. ?Edward<SUP>5</SUP>/ Ned, born say 1780, head of a Richland District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a]. Eleanor, Keziah, Lydney and Elizabeth Harris were residents of Richland District in 1806 when they petitioned the South Carolina legislature to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885].

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9. Phebe<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born about 1734, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, supposed sixty years old, born free in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 75]. She may have been the mother of

<DIR>19 i. James, born about 1748.

<DIR>ii. John<SUP>2</SUP>, born about 1752, a "yellow" complexioned soldier born in Prince George County who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution in Dinwiddie County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 150]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1790 and 1792 and a "free" taxable from 1794 to 1801 when he was listed as a cooper in the same district (Braddock Goodwyn's) as another "free" John Harris and a "free" Andrew Harris [Personal Property Tax List 1801 B, p.7]. He was called a "free man of Colour" on 27 April 1818 when he made a declaration in Prince George County to obtain a pension for his services, stating that he enlisted in 1777 in the 15th Virginia Regiment. He was taken from the regiment and made a servant to President Monroe who was then the major of horse and aide-de-camp to Lord Sterling. He made a second declaration on 18 May 1821 in Petersburg court, stating that he was about sixty-nine years old and residing in Dinwiddie County in the immediate vicinity of Petersburg. He was a cooper by trade and his family consisted of himself and four children: three boys and a girl [M805-401, frame 0640].
iii. Aggy, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Prince George County near Petersburg. Her son Thomas registered on 10 June 1805: a dark brown Negro man, feet inches five high, twenty years old 10 Aug. next, son of Agga Harris a free Negroe woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 76, 291].

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:49 AM
iv. Betty, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty four years old, born free & raised in Prince George County near Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 77].


10. Nathan<SUP>1</SUP> Harris, born say 1735, was taxable in his own household with his wife Amey in the 1758 Granville County, North Carolina list of Nathaniel Harris. He entered 200 acres on the waters of Beaverdam Creek in Granville County on 22 March 1780 and another 350 acres in 1779 [Pruitt, Land Entries, Granville County, 49]. He was assessed tax on 737 pounds in Beaverdam in 1780, but by 1785 he was in Northampton County where he was a buyer at the sale of an estate [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:51]. In 1800 he was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" [NC:449] where he was renting the estate of Edward Capell [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:111] and 7 "other free" in Franklin County in 1810 [NC:826]. Nathan and Amey may have been the parents of

<DIR><DIR>i. Ephraim, head of a Franklin County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:826].
ii. Elizabeth, born say 1762, married Drury Walden in Northampton County in 1780 according to his pension records.
iii. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].
iv. Mary, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:451].
v. Hamilton, born 1776-94, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26], and 2 "free colored" in Wilkes County in 1820 [NC:505].
vi. Ary, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].
vii. Ruthen, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].
viii. William, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27].

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11. _____ Harris, born say 1743, was the mother of several illegitimate children by Dixon Brown. Dixon made a 24 January 1811 Charles City County will, proved 18 January 1821, by which he left 30 acres to his illegitimate children Polly Harris, Susannah Harris (wife of James Harris), and Peggy Bowman which was the land they were then living on [WB 2:471]. Susannah Harris died intestate without a living child before October 1826 when Polly Harris, Morris Harris and Patsy his wife, Pegg Bowman, James Brown, Jr., (son of Dixon) and his wife Sally (nee Stewart), and Peter Brown and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell the 10 acres she received by her father's will. Edward Brown was the highest bidder at $32 [DB 7:371]. ____ was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Polly Harris, born say 1760, died before 26 May 1832 when her estate was sold. Edward Bowman, Abraham Brown and John Bowman were buyers at the sale [WB 4:29-30].
ii. Susannah, born about 1762, fifty-eight years old in 1820 when her husband James Harris applied for a pension [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 36]. She died before October 1826 when her heirs appointed James Brown to sell her land [DB 7:371].
iii. Pegg Bowman.

</DIR>20 iv. ?Morris, born say 1784.

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12. Joan Harris, born say 1752, was a "Mulatto" servant who was discharged from the service of Benjamin Abbot by the Halifax County, Virginia court on 17 June 1773 because he had no indentures for her [Orders 1772-3, 155]. On 16 January 1777 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out Mill Harris, daughter of Johannah Harris to Benjamin Abbott, and on 18 March 1784 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind Jean's "bastard Mulattoe boy" Micajah Harris to Edward Akin but rescinded the order on 17 June that year and ordered him returned to his mother [Pleas 1774-9, 185; 1783-6, 35, 75]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Mill, born say 1776.
ii. Micajah, born say 1780.

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13. Edward<SUP>4</SUP> Harris, born say 1762, was a soldier from Chesterfield County who enlisted in the Revolution while a resident of Amelia County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 36]. He may have been the Edward Harris who was head of a Charles City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and a "Mulattoe" taxable in Chesterfield County two tithes and three horses in 1810, 1811 and 1813, living on James Scott's land with his six children in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 824; Waldrep, 1813 Tax List]. He was the father of

<DIR><DIR>i. Archer<SUP>2</SUP>, born 18 August 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 June 1836: son of Ned Harris, mulatto man, twenty three the 18th August last [Minutes 1830-9, 281].

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14. Mary Harris, born say 1738, was living in Brunswick County on 24 November 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "natural child" Isham Harris [Orders 1756-7, 174]. She was apparently identical to "Mary Haris now Stuart" whose son Isham Harris was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Parish in Mecklenburg County court on 8 November 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 231]. She was married to William Stewart when they sold 200 acres on Little Creek in Mecklenburg County on 11 February 1788 [DB 7:253]. William Stewart was head of a Wake County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105] and 11 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:798]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Isham, born say 1756, bound out in Mecklenburg County on 8 November 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 231]. He sued Frederick Collier and Samuel Lark for trespass, assault and battery in Mecklenburg County court on 13 July 1784. Lucy Poole was deposed as his witness. Both suits were dismissed [Orders 1784-7, 95, 141, 169, 261, 263]. He married Mary Dobey (Dolby), 11 January 1792 Wake County bond and was head of a Wake County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:769].

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15. John<SUP>3</SUP> Harris, born say 1755, was head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:77]. He was married to the widow of Stephen Walden by May 1791 when he settled Stephen's Warren County estate [Gammon, Records of Estates, Warren County, I:21]. Solomon Harris, John Walden, and Jesse Cunningham were buyers at the sale of the estate [WB:6:82]. John's children may have been

<DIR><DIR>i. Kizee, born before 1776, head of a Warren County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:754] and one "free colored" in 1820 (Casiri Harris) [NC:816].
ii. Phil, born say 1778, head of a Warren County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:808], 3 in 1810 [NC:758] and called Philemon Harris when he was head of an Orange County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:290].

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16. Phebe<SUP>2</SUP> Harris, born say 1755, was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 12 June 1780 when the churchwardens were ordered to bind out her daughter Elizabeth, "a poor orphan" [Orders 1779-84, 53]. On 11 February 1782 the churchwardens were ordered to bind her "Bastards" Milley and Jeremiah (no race mentioned) to Edward McDaniel [Orders 1779-84, 119]. Her children were

<DIR><DIR>i. Elizabeth, born say 1772.
ii. Milley, born say 1773.
iii. Jeremiah, born say 1775, married Lydia Chavous, 13 November 1797 Mecklenburg County bond, James Chavis security.
iv. ?John, married Rittah Stewart, 27 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Jere Harris security.

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:50 AM
17. James<SUP>2</SUP> Harris, born say 1760, was taxable in Charles City County in 1783, called James Harris, Jr. He was taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1790 and taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1800, charged with 2 tithes in 1806, called James, Sr., in 1810, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7; 1788-1814] and head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 (called James Harris, Sr.) [VA:958]. He was a resident of Charles City County when he enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment. He applied for a pension in 1820 stating that he was a farmer with a fifty-eight-year-old wife who was sickly [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 36]. His wife Susannah Harris, illegitimate daughter of Dixon Brown, received 10 acres of land by the 24 January 1811 Charles City County will of her father. She died intestate without a living child before October 1826 when (her sister) Polly Harris, Morris Harris and Patsy his wife, (her sister) Pegg Bowman, James Brown, Jr., (son of Dixon) and his wife Sally, and Peter Brown and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell the land [DB 7:371]. James Harris died before 15 March 1834 when his estate was sold and divided between James Brown, Peter Brown, Burwell Harris, and James Harris. Peter Brown was executor [WB 4:72]. James and Susannah may have been the parents of

<DIR><DIR>i. James<SUP>4</SUP>, Jr., born say 1782, head of a Charles City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. The inventory of his Charles City County estate, taken on 2 June 1826, included a sheep, a sow and a bedstead and totalled $13.92 [WB 3:181].

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18. Chavis Harris, born say 1780, and his wife Susanna were named in the 12 November 1803 Charles City County will of his mother Frances Harris [WB 1:650]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. His father-in-law Dixon Brown made a 24 January 1811 Charles City County will, proved 18 January 1821, by which he gave Chavis and his wife Susannah and (her brother) Dixon Brown, Jr., 40 acres where they were then living. He was called Henry C. Harris when he proved Dixon Brown, Sr.'s will on 18 January 1821 [WB 2:471]. On 4 January 1825 he was called Chavis Harris when he purchased 3-1/3 acres in Charles City County known as "Binns" adjoining his land and bounded by Henry Adams [DB 7:41]. But he was called Henry C. Chavis when he purchased 75 acres adjoining his land and bounded by Henry Adams and Morris Harris from David and his wife Lockey Goin on 8 November 1830 [DB 7:476]. His wife Sally Harris (apparently his second, born about 1795) obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 June 1832: a woman of color aged thirty seven years (wife of Henry C. Harris), born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 109]. He was called Henry C. Harris in his 24 December 1832 Charles City County will, proved 21 February 1833. He gave a bed to his son Benjamin, gave 3-1/3 acres of land which he had purchased from Cornelius and Lockey Brown to his sons Burwell and Benjamin Harris, gave grandchildren Zebedie and Julian Ann Harris a cow, daughter Patsey a bed, sons Thomas, William and Burwell Harris 20 shillings each and divided the remainder between all his children. He named Peter Brown and his son Burwell Harris executors. Francis Bowman dug his grave and James Brown made his coffin [WB 3:513-4; 4:116]. His children were

<DIR><DIR>i. Thomas, born say 1805.
ii. William, born say 1807.
iii. Burwell, born 3 July 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Henry C. Harris, twenty one years of age 3d July last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 83].
iv. Benjamin Hampton, born in February 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Henry C. Harris, a boy of brown complexion, nineteen years in February last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 83].

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19. James Harris, born about 1748 in Dinwiddie County according to his Revolutionary War pension file, enlisted in the service while resident in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1775. In 1781 he moved to the part of Henry County which later became Patrick County and applied for a pension from there in 1835. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County in 1799, listed with 2 tithes in 1799, 1804 and 1805 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 269, 398, 428, 460, 538, 598] and head of a Patrick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. His widow Keziah was head of a Patrick County household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 and was an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" woman, born in Virginia, counted in the 1850 census [VA:389]. She applied for a survivor's Revolutionary War pension in 1855 stating that her maiden name was Keziah Minor and that she and James had married in Rockingham County, North Carolina, in 1801. James was apparently the father of

<DIR><DIR>i. Agnes, daughter of James Harris, married Burbage Goin, 26 July 1810 Patrick County bond. Beveridge Going, born before 1776, was head of a Patrick County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:106].
ii. James, Jr., taxable in Patrick County from [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames ].
iii. Alexander, a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County from 1807 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 571]. He married Judith Fendley, 1807 Patrick County bond.
iv. Tabitha, married John Rickman, 1805 Patrick County bond.
v. Nancy, married Cam Loggins, 1817 Patrick County bond.
vi. Robert, married Nancy Goins, daughter of James and Nancy, 1816 Patrick County bond.

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20. Morris Harris, born say 1784, was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939]. In October 1826 he and his wife Patsy appointed James Brown to sell 10 acres which (his aunt?) Susannah Harris, deceased, received by the will of Dixon Brown [DB 7:371]. Morris was the father of

<DIR><DIR>i. Sandy, born 2 July 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 December 1830: son of Morris Harris, a bright mulatto man, twenty two years of age 2 July last [Minutes 1830-7, 35].
ii. Mitchel, born 11 September 1811, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 February 1833: son of Morris Harris, a bright mulattoe man, aged twenty one years 11 September last [Minutes 1830-7, 142].
iii. Pamelia, born 4 June 1820, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged fourteen last June 4, bright mulatto [Minutes 1830-7, 158].
iv. Matthew, born June 1822, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: son of Morris Harris, aged twelve in June last, a mulatto boy [Minutes 1830-7, 142].
v. Susan, born July 1824, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged ten in July last, a mulatto girl [Minutes 1830-7, 142].
vi. Abby, born April 1827, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged seven in April last, a mulatto girl [Minutes 1830-7, 142].
vii. Peter, born 20 January 1814, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Morris Harris, mulatto man, twenty one 20 January last [Minutes 1830-7, 238[.

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 01:51 AM
Other members of the Harris family from the Petersburg area were

<DIR><DIR>i. Fanny, born say 1756, mother of Nancy Braughton (Brogdon?) (born about 1775) who registered in Petersburg on 8 July 1805: Nancy Braughton, a very light Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty years old, long curled hair, holes in her ears, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield, daughter of Fanny Harris [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 294].
ii. Rebecca, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, about thirty four years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 24].

</DIR>21 iii. John<SUP>5</SUP>, born say 1761.

<DIR>iv. David, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 14 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, forty five years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 599].
v. Paterson, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 7 December 1796: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet ten and a half inches high, twenty two years old, with short bushy hair, his eyes rather dark yellowish grey, born free & raised in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 118].
vi. Patsy, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a light yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, thirty five years old, born free in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 579].
vii. William, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 24 June 1805: a brown Mulatto man, five feet five inches high, twenty two years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 293]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1806 to 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 660, 704, 753].
viii. Archer<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1788, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1809 living on Mrs. Hamblin's hire land [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 738].

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21. John<SUP>5</SUP> Harris, born say 1761, was a soldier who enlisted in the Revolution in Petersburg. His children were living in Wilkes County, North Carolina, on 3 July 1852 when they applied for a pension for his services as a drummer. They declared that he and their mother Mary Walker were married by the Episcopal Minister in Dinwiddie County in October or November 1785. They moved to Randolph County, North Carolina, near the old courthouse, called Randolph Cross Roads, and lived there for five or six years, and then moved to Rowan County near Lexington (Davidson County) where their father died on 20 April 1806. John may have been the "free" John Harris who was taxable in Dinwiddie County in Braddock Goodwyn's district adjoining "free" Andrew Harris in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1801 B, p.7]. Their mother married Drury Mitchell, head of a Wilkes County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:867]. Their father had a record of the marriage and the births of his children, but the record was "taken off" by Drury Mitchell [CR 104.923.2 by NCGSJ V:251-2]. Mary purchased 85 acres in Wilkes County from Jordan Chavis in 1829 [DB M:206]. Her 20 August 1833 Wilkes County will, proved February 1834, named her seven children: Nancy, Lucy, Jehu, Isaac, Polly Baley, John, and Ibby [WB 4:169]. Their children were

<DIR><DIR>i. Nancy, born about 1786, married William Ferguson, 27 October 1802 Rowan County bond. She was the oldest child of John and Mary Harris according to William Ferguson's deposition in support of the Harris family pension application. William Ferguson was head of a Wilkes County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:543].
ii. Lucy, born say 1792, married Jordan Chavis as his second wife.
iii. Jehu, born about 1794, married Clarissy Chavis, 1 June 1821 Wilkes County bond. She was fifty-eight years old in 1852.
iv. Isaac, born about 1800, married Icy Wooten 22 September 1832 Wilkes County bond. He was fifty-two years old in 1852.
v. Polly Baley, probably the wife of Jesse Bailey, "free colored" head of a Wilkes County household of 4 in 1820.
vi. John<SUP>6</SUP>, deceased by the time his mother made her will.
vii. Iby Anderson, born about 1807, forty-five years old in 1852.

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Other Harris family members in Virginia were

<DIR><DIR>i. John, born say 1710, a "Mullatto" fined by the Accomack County court on 4 January 1736/7 for swearing six profane oaths [Orders 1731-36, 201].
ii. George<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1752, a "Negroe" tithable in Gloucester County in 1770 [Tax List 1770-7, 199]. He was a "Free Negro" in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, where he was tithable from 1807 to 1812 and tithable on a horse in 1815 [Cocke, Hanover County Taxables, St. Paul's Parish, 57].

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Craven County, North Carolina
1. Thomas Harris, born about 1747, was a twelve-year-old "Mulatto" orphan ordered bound to Thomas Haline to be a tanner by the 11 May 1759 Craven County court [Minutes 1758-62, 32b]. He was head of a Craven County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He was probably the Thomas Harris who was taxed on 100 acres in District 3 of Craven County in 1779 [LP 30.1]. And he may have been the brother of John Harris who was head of a Craven County household of 6 "other free," 3 slaves, and a white woman in 1790 [NC:130]. John was taxable on 335 acres in District 3 of Craven County in 1779 [LP 30.1]. Thomas was probably the father of

<DIR><DIR>i. Isaac, head of a Craven County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:76].
ii. Mary, head of a Craven County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:71].

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