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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 02:38 AM
COLE FAMILY
1. Benedict Cole, born say 1665, was the "Negro (baptized)" slave of Richard Cole. Thomas Kirton married Richard Cole's widow and declared in Westmoreland County court on 28 August 1678 that "the Negro boy called Benedict Cole" was to be free at Kirton's death or departure from the country and to serve "but till the adge of twenty and no more." Kirton died before 27 July 1692 when Benedict successfully sued for his freedom in Westmoreland County court [Orders 1675-1689, 130; 1698-1705, 68a]. He may have been the ancestor of the Cole family of Fairfax and Prince William Counties, Virginia. They were probably related to the Cole family of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Members of the family in Virginia were

<DIR>2 i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.
3 ii. Phebe, born say 1732.

<DIR>iii. Robert<SUP>1</SUP>, born say 1735, a "free Negro" of Truro Parish, Fairfax County, presented by the grand jury on 22 May 1760 for living in fornication with ___wood (probably a white woman) by the information of William Moler [Orders 1756-63, pt. 1, 463].

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2. Elizabeth Cole, born say 1730, was living in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 29 March 1751 when she (no race indicated) petitioned the court setting forth that she was unjustly detained as a servant by Francis Summers. The court ruled that she was free and ordered her discharged from his service [Orders 1749-54, 143]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. ?William, born say 1755, a "Molato" living in George Dent's household on 21 November 1771 when the Fairfax County court presented Dent for failing to list him as a tithable [Orders 1770-2, 319]. He was taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1787, 1792, from 1794 to 1797, and from 1803 to 1810, called "Black" in 1804, 1806 and 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 95, 203, 254, 309, 385, 523, 571, 704, 732], head of a Prince William County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].
ii. Betty Handless, born about 1756, registered in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 31 August 1809: Tawny colour ... about fifty three years old ... Know her mother Betty Cole, both born free in Fairfax County, Virginia, Wm. Rhodes [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, pp. 19-20].

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3. Phebe Cole, born say 1732, was living Fairfax County on 20 December 1752 when she was presented by the churchwardens of Truro Parish. The presentment was dismissed on 22 February 1755 [Orders 1749-54, 269; 1754-6, 183, 266]. She was a "free negro" living in Dettingen Parish, Prince William County, on 7 August 1767 when her children Robert, Catherine, Thomas, Joseph, Eleanor, and Sarah were bound apprentices [Orders 1766-69, 56]. Thomas and Robert were bound to William Bennett on 10 June 1768, and Catherine and Joseph were bound to him on 7 September the same year [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 56-59]. She was taxable in Prince William County on a free male in 1795 and taxable on a horse in 1796 and 1797 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 267, 309, 335]. Her children were

<DIR>4 i. Robert<SUP>2</SUP>, born say 1753.
5 ii. Catherine, born about 1755.

<DIR>iii. Thomas, born say 1757, bound an apprentice carpenter to William Bennett on 10 June 1768. He was listed among seven deserters from Thomas W. Ewell's Company of State Troops in a 20 June 1777 advertisement in the Virginia Gazette, described as: a dark mulatto, about 5 feet 7 inches high living in Prince William County [Purdie edition, p.1, col. 3]. He was taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1786, 1787, 1792, and from 1794 to 1798, called a "free Black" in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 71, 95, 203, 254, 309, 362].
iv. Joseph, born say 1760, bound an apprentice carpenter to William Bennett on 7 September 1768. He was taxable in Prince William County in 1787 and 1796 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 95, 309].
v. Eleanor/ Nelly, born about 1765, a "free Black" taxable in the lower district of Prince William County on a horse in 1798, a free male tithe in 1803, 2 free tithes in 1804, a "B" taxable on a free male and a horse in 1806, a "Black" taxable on a horse in 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 362, 523, 638, 732], head of a Prince William County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508]. She registered in Prince William County on 5 June 1815 and produced her papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 11 June 1815: a free black woman about fifty years of age ... was born free [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, pp. 19-20].
vi. Sarah, a "B" taxable on a horse in the lower district of Prince William County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 639], head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].
vii. ?Henry, taxable in Prince William County from 1794 to 1798 and from 1803 to 1810, listed as a "free Black" in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 254, 266, 309, 362, 523, 638, 704], head of a Prince William County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

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4. Robert<SUP>2</SUP> Cole, born say 1753, was bound an apprentice shoemaker to William Bennett in Dettingen Parish on 10 June 1768 [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 56]. He married Lucy Chavers/ Chavis, "both black persons" according to the Charlotte County deposition of Mary Belcher [N.C. Stack File C.R. 099.928.11 by NCGSJ III:21]. Robert apparently died before 9 February 1784 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered the churchwardens to bind out Lucy's orphan son Robert Cole [Orders 1779-84, 515]. Lucy's nephew John Jackson Chavis, son of her sister Betty Chavis, was bound as an apprentice to William Stewart in Mecklenburg County; Stewart moved to Wake County, North Carolina, about 1790; and John Jackson went with him and died there about 1808 when Stewart tried to prove his nuncupative Wake County will. Lucy challenged the will by presenting a deposition taken on 27 April 1808 from Mary Belcher of Charlotte County that John Jackson Chavis was christened in her home and that Lucy was his only living relative [N.C. Stack File C.R. 099.928.11 by NCGSJ III:21; Haun, Wake County Court Minutes VII:67-8, 151]. Lucy recorded the inventory of John Jackson Chavis's estate in Wake County in February 1809 [Wynne, Record of Wills, Inventories, II:107]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County household of two "free Negro" or "Mulatto" females over the age of sixteen in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-21, frame 307], a "free colored" woman with a "free colored" boy under the age of fourteen in 1820 [VA:144a], and was counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census as a 100-year-old Black woman who was blind, listed with Susan and Peter Brandom in the household next to Israel Cole, a forty-five-year-old Black carpenter [VA:104b]. Robert and Lucy were the parents of

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 02:39 AM
<DIR><DIR>i. Robert<SUP>3</SUP>, born about 1774, taxable in William Stewart's Mecklenburg County household in 1792 and was responsible for his own tithe in 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frames 451, 516]. He married Mary Stewart, 31 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Martin Cousins security. Robert was security for the Mecklenburg County marriage of Martin Cousins and Elizabeth Brandon of the same date. On 10 October 1803 he was ordered to work on a road in Mecklenburg County with Robert Brannum, Thomas Spence, William Stewart, Humphrey Wilson, Joseph Stewart, Frederick Ivey, Pompey Mayo, and Richard Dunston [Orders 1803-5, 45]. He registered in Mecklenburg County on 14 November 1803: Ordered that it be certified that Robert Cole, planter, is a free man, that he is the age of twenty nine years, about five feet ten Inches high and of dark complexion [Orders 1803-5, 52].
ii. Jincey, married Martin Cousins, 31 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Robert Cole security.

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Lucy's children were

<DIR><DIR>i. Burwell, son of Lucy Cole, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Ellyson Crew to be a planter on 8 October 1798 [Orders 1798-1801, 39].
ii. ?Caty, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Ellyson Crew on 9 December 1799, no parent named [Orders 1798-1801, 280].
iii. ?Thomas, a "Malatto" bound by the Mecklenburg County court as an apprentice to Jacob Garrot, wheelwright, on 9 September 1805 [Orders 1803-5, 461].

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5. Catherine Cole, born about 1755, was bound apprentice to William Bennett in Prince William County on 7 September 1768. She was taxable on a horse in the lower district of Prince William County in 1797 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 336]. She registered in Prince William County on 22 May 1810 and produced her papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 8 June 1815: was at that time fifty five years of age, born free in the County aforesaid [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, p.28]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. John, born about 1773, taxable in Prince William County from 1794 to 1798, listed as "Black" in 1795 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 254, 267, 309, 362], registered in Prince William County on 24 March 1806 and produced his papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria: a free black man, son of Katy Cole, a free black woman ... thirty three years of age [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 25, p.24]. He was a "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 3 in 1810 [VA:243].
ii. ?Samuel, head of a Prince William County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].
iii. ?David, taxable in Prince William County from 1795 to 1797 and from 1803 to 1810, called a "Blackman" in 1795 and 1803 and 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 267, 523, 638, 703], head of a head of a Prince William County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].
iv. ?Frances, a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in Prince William County in 1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 503].

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Prince Edward County
1. Mary Cole, born say 1745, was the mother of an "orphan" Abigail Cole who was bound apprentice to John Owen until the age of thirty-one in Prince Edward County in November 1757 [Orders 1754-8, 133]. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Abigail, born say 1755.
ii. ?Sally, born say 1770, a "free negro" listed in Pittsylvania County with her two unnamed daughters over the age of sixteen in 1813 and (her son?) William Cole in 1814 [PPTL 1813-23, frames 6, 81, 198].
iii. ?Robin, born about 1784, registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 26 October 1812: aged 28 years about five feet eight inches high of a dark colour and who it appears was born of a free Woman is hereby registered as a free negroe [Register, no.36].

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South Carolina
1. Jonathan Cole, born say 1705, was living in Wadmalaw, South Carolina, when the birth of his "Mulatto" son Thomas was recorded in the register of St. Philip's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina. He was the father of

<DIR>2 i. Thomas, born 14 April 1729.

<DIR>ii. Susanna, married William Raper [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 15].

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2. Thomas<SUP>1</SUP> Cole, born 14 April 1729, was the "Mulatto" son of Jonathan Cole of Charleston, South Carolina. He was called "an Adult mulatto" on 5 June 1754 when he was baptized in St. Philip's Parish [Salley, Register of St. Philip's Parish, 1720-58, 100, 145]. He called himself a bricklayer in his 21 October 1771 Charleston will, proved 8 November the same year. He directed his executors to sell his house in Beresford's Alley and slaves Prince, Will, and Carolina and to divide the proceeds among his children: Thomas, Barbara, William, Elizabeth, and John Cole, and to sell his house and land on Meeting Street and divide the proceeds among his wife Ruth and children when his youngest child came of age. He named his friend Thomas Lotan Smith, Esq., and brother-in-law William Raper executors [WB 14:109-10]. His wife Ruth was a "Free" head of a St. Philips & Michaels Parish, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 and head of a Newberry District household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:68] and a "free Negro" head of a Newberry District household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:117a]. She called herself the sister of William Raper on 12 October 1788 when she and her daughter Barbara petitioned the legislature to be appointed administrators of his widow Susanna Raper, "a free woman of color" [Schweninger, Race, Slavery and Free Black Petitions, no. 11378801]. She was the sponsor for the baptism of her granddaughter Ruth Raper Garden at St. Philip's Parish on 13 March 1812 [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 166]. Her 31 January 1817 Charleston will was proved on 15 August the same year. She left her house and lot in Federal Street, a slave named Amey (daughter of Flora), and her pew in St. Philip's Church to her daughter Barbara Maria Bampfield, wife of George Bampfield, and after her death to her four grandchildren: Thomas Cole, John Cole, Eliza Cole, and Eliza Maria Jones. She left the house where she was residing in Guignard Street to her grandchildren John and Eliza Cole and directed that her slave Flora with her daughters Lucinda and Belinda be sold and the proceeds divided among her four grandchildren. And she left the lot and premises adjoining her house in Guignard Street to her daughter Magdalen Brown. She appointed her nephew-in-law John Garden executor [WB 33:1276-7]. Thomas and Ruth were the parents of

<DIR><DIR>i. Thomas<SUP>2</SUP>, "free" head of a St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and a "free colored" head of a Charleston household with one slave in 1840.
ii. Barbara Maria Bampfield, died about 1832 when her executor, Jehu Jones, Jr., sold her slave Fatima for $200 and divided the proceeds among Sarah Cole and Elizabeth Maria Jones.
iii. William.
iv. Elizabeth.
v. Magdalen Brown.
vi. John, married Sarah.

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Other members of the Cole family in South Carolina were

<DIR><DIR>i. John, head of a Union District household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:241].
ii. Sarah, head of a Newberry District household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:68].
iii. Mary, head of a Newberry District household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69].
iv. Joseph, head of a Kershaw District household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [SC:410].

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Ga-Nc Collins
04-26-2008, 02:40 AM
COLEMAN FAMILY
1. Judith, born say 1700, was an Indian or the descendant of an Indian brought into Virginia by Francis Coleman sometime after the year 1705 and held as a slave for her lifetime. Her descendants Dick and Pat, who were held as slaves by Coleman's descendants, sued for and won their freedom in a case which was affirmed on appeal in the Fall of the year 1793 [Catterall, Judicial Cases, I:101-2]. Other descendants won their freedom from Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County before 1 July 1789, from John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County before 16 August 1794, from Joseph Hardaway of Dinwiddie County in November 1797 and from John Wyche of Brunswick County in 1819. Judith was the ancestor of

<DIR>2 i. Sarah, born say 1740.

<DIR>ii. David<SUP>1</SUP>, born about 1744, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a dark brown stout, well made Mulatto Man, five feet eight inches high, fifty six years old, with short bushy hair, formerly held as a slave by Joseph Hardaway but obtained his freedom by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court in November 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 170].
iii. Cuffee, born about 1748, sued James Ware and James Bromly in Petersburg Hustings Court on 5 October 1785 for trespass, assault and battery. His suit against Ware was dismissed on 3 November 1785. And the court dismissed his suit against Bromly on 3 January 1786 when his witnesses Samuel Davis and Alexander Gordon failed to appear. On 6 September 1791 the court ordered him to give security of 40 shillings for his good behavior on complaint of George Morrison [Orders 1785-91, 68, 71, 72, 80, 90; Minutes 1791-7, 129]. He was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 75]. He registered in Southampton County on 30 March 1805: age 57, blk., 5 feet 10 inches high, Sued his freedom, Dinwidy [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 322].
iv. Daniel, born about 1752, registered in Petersburg on 10 February 1798: a dark Brown Free Negro, or Indian, six feet two inches high, about forty six years old, short bushy hair, a little grey, formerly held as a slave by Joseph Hardaway but obtained his freedom by a judgment of the Gen'l Court in Nov. 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 132]. He was a ditcher living near George May when he was counted as a "free Negro and Mulatto" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1801 [PPTL, 1800-9, B list, p.25]. He may have been the Daniel Coleman who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143].
v. Dick, orphan of Judy Coleman, deceased, ordered bound out by William Foushee, overseer of the poor for the third district of Henrico County, to William Waddell on 3 September 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 131]. He was head of a Richmond County, Virginia household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:401].
vi. Pat, won her freedom from the Coleman family in 1793.
vii. Betty<SUP>1</SUP>, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown woman, five feet six & a half inches height, twenty seven years old, liberated by a judgment of Gen'l Court from John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County being a descendant of an Indian woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 32].
viii. Nancy, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown, well made Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, twenty seven years old, freed by Judgment of the Gen'l Court of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County being a descendant of an Indian [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 37].
ix. Tempe, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown, well made woman, five feet two inches high, twenty six years old, liberated by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County as being a descendant of an Indian. Renewed 25 Sept. 1799, 14 Oct. 1800, 20 Sept. 1803 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 33].
x. Charles, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a dark Mulatto man, near five feet eight inches high, about twenty five years old, was born in the Possession of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County from whom he obtained his freedom by judgment of the Gen'l Court being the descendant of an Indian & served as an apprentice with Robert Armstead in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 11].
xi. Betty<SUP>2</SUP>, born about 1777, bound to Margaret Gordon by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 9 November 1791 [Orders 1791-7, 15]. She registered in Petersburg on 27 May 1805: a dark brown negro woman, five feet four and a half inches high, twenty eight years old, formerly held as a slave by John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County & liberated by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court as descended of an Indian [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 290].

</DIR>3 xii. Caty, born about 1779.

<DIR>xiii. Jemima, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1805: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 333].
xiv. Hannah, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 17 September 1802: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 240].
xv. Betty<SUP>3</SUP>, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 18 September 1803: a free Negro woman, dark brown, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 260].
xvi. Rachel, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: a dark brown Negro woman, four feet eleven inches high, twenty years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 310]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:124a].
xvii. Lucy, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 31 December 1808: a dark brown free Negro woman, five feet three and a half inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 443]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].
xviii. Bob, head of a Prince George County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:550].
xix. Aggy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:120a].

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2. Sarah Coleman, born say 1740, won her freedom from Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County. She was free before 19 August 1794 when her daughter Susannah registered in Petersburg and she was probably free before 1 July 1789 when her son David Coleman was bound as an apprentice in Petersburg. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Susannah, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a dark brown woman, five feet three and a half inches high, about twenty six years old, stout made, the daughter of Sarah Coleman who obtained her freedom of Robert Hall by a suit in the Gen'l Court & the said Susannah has been allowed to pass as free by the sd Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County to whom she belonged by her mother's obtaining her freedom [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 58].
ii. David<SUP>2</SUP>, born about 1779, a "free Mulatto Boy" (no age or parent named), bound by the Hustings Court of Petersburg as an apprentice cabin maker to John McCloud on 1 July 1789 [Orders 1784-91, 286]. He registered in Petersburg on 25 April 1801: a stout, well-made dark brown Negro man, five feet five inches high, nineteen years old, short knotty hair, a son of Sally Coleman who formerly was held by Robert Hall of the County of Dinwiddie & obtained her freedom by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 215].
iii. Disey, orphan of Sarah Coleman, ordered bound out by William Foushee, overseer of the poor for the third district of Henrico County, to William Waddell on 3 September 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 131].
iv. ?Keziah, bound by the Hustings Court of Petersburg to Judith Moriarity on 6 August 1789 [Orders 1784-91, 286].

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3. Caty, born about 1779, registered in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 27 September 1819: Caty, a woman about Forty years of age, light complexion, Five feet one & a half Inches high...recovered her freedom in Brunswick Superior Court at September term 1819 of John Wyche. She was the mother of

<DIR><DIR>i. Fanny Coleman, born about 1807, registered in Brunswick County on 28 September 1829: a free woman of light complexion, five feet four inches high, about twenty two years of age...is one of the children of Caty who recovered her freedom from John Wyche in...1819 [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 29, 104].
ii. Green Coleman, born about 1809, registered in Brunswick County on 26 September 1831: of dark complexion, about twenty one years old, five feet seven inches and a quarter high...one of the children of Caty who recovered her freedom from John Wyche...in 1819 [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 119].

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Other members of a Coleman family were

<DIR><DIR>i. Thomas, born about 1703, a "small negro man, aged about fifty years," who presented the deposition of John Binum to the Halifax County, Virginia court on 14 June 1753. Binum stated that Coleman was free born and that his family lived in Surry County, Virginia. The court ruled that he should be freed [Pleas 1752-5, pt.1, 162].
ii. Ned, a "Free Negro" living with (his wife?) Rose Coleman on a lot in Leedstown, Westmoreland County, where he sold bread [Virginia Genealogist 31:46]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.


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