PDA

View Full Version : list of captives released in 1765



vance hawkins
10-17-2002, 09:30 AM
The following was sent to me on another list -- I don't know who Col. Bouquet is/was -- I don't know what event this is talking about even, something that happened in 1765. But it mentions "Tuscarawa's Valley" and I thought that might be in Virginia or North Carolina, so I thought yall might be interested. If any of yall know what event this is talking about, please let me know. I haven't edited any of the message.

My g-g-g-granama was Mary (Polly) Wood, born about 1800, and there is a "John Wood" listed, and her father was named John Wood. He married a Dickson (Dixon?) girl, but we know nothing but their names, about these people. But if the "John Wood" listed is a grown man in 1765, he is too old to have been her father. Maybe they were related, maybe a grandfather or great uncle? I just don't know . . . maybe they are not related at all . . . http://winwinworld.net/SaponiForum/UBB/frown.gif

But maybe someone sees names here that are related to them, so I'm forewarding.

I'll write the person who sent it and ask what it is all about, too.

vance --

==================

Captives Released by Col. Bouquet in 1765

-----------------------------------------

SOURCE: Booth, Russell H. The Tuscarawas Valley.

Names of Captives. If you are related to these captives please
contact Debbie to add your story to the Surname Index.


----------------------------------

Anna Catherine
BABSON, Mordicai/ BACON, Catherine/ BASKIN, Peggy/ BEATY, James/
BELL, James/ Betty/ Betty-black eyes/ BIRD, Margaret/ BIRD, Molly/
Bittikanety/ BLANKENSHIP, Stephen/ BONNET, Henry/ BOYD, Sarah &
Thomas/ BRIDGETs, Son/ BRYAN, Rebecca/ BURD, John/ BUTLER, James or
Jemmy BUTTLER.
CAMPBELL, James & Mary/ CARPENTER, Jerry & Solomon/ CARTMILL, Molly &
Peggy/ CASTLE,Mary/ Cawacawachi/ Christina/ CLANDINNON, Jean/ Clark,
And/ CLAUSSER, Betty & Magdalen & Mary/ Clem, ? & Ludovich/ COBBLE,
Michael/ COCHRAN, John/ COLLEY, Peggy/ COLLINS, Thomas/ Conogoniony/
COON, Elizabeth & two children/ COUNSMAN, Elizabeth/ CRAVEN, Mary/
Crooked Legs/ CROW, Jane & Polly/ CUNINGHAM, Marg.
David bighead/ DAVID, Will/ DAVISON, Agnus, Molly & Nancy/ DEVINE,
Morice/ DIVER, Hans & John/ DONOHOO, John or John Donehoo/ Dorothy's
Son.
Ebenezer/ EWINS, John/ FINCHER, Rachell/ FINLEY, Ann/ FISHBACK,
Margaret & Susan/ FISHER, John/ Flat nose/ FLAUGHTERY, Esther/
FORSYTH, John/ FRANSE, Elizabeth/ FREELING, John & Peggy/ FULKISON,
Elizabeth.
GIBSON, Sarah/ GILMORE, Elizabeth & Elizabeth Jr. & Jane & John/
GORE, Rose/ GREENWOOD, Mary.
HAIG, John/ HAMILTON, Arch & Mary & Miriam/ Hannah/ HANNEL, Mary/
Hans/ HARMANTROUT, Charl & Christopher/ HARPER, Eve & Thomas/ HARRIS,
James/ HEAT, Catherine/ Henry/ Henry, Elizabeth/ HOUSE, Christina/
HUNTZMAN, Adam & Barbara & John/ HUTCHINSON, Florence & David/ HYERD,
Leonard.
ICE, Catherine & Christian & Elizabeth & Eve & John & Lewis & Thomas
& William/ INNIS, Francis & Jenny/ Irena.
Jacob/ James or Jemmy/ Jean or Ketakatwitche/ JOHNSON, David/ Joseph
or Pechyloothammo.
Ketty, Kincake, Eleonard & 2 children, Kitty, Knox, Jane & Mary &
Robert & Susan & Susan Jr.
LANSISCO, Mary & child/ LEAKE, Hans & William/ LEGENFIELD, Mary
Catherine/ LE ROY, John Jacob/ LINENGER, Margareta & Rachel/
LINGERFIELD, Catherine/ Louaveska/ LOWRY, Jane & Mary.
McCORD, Mary/ McCULLOUGH/ McILROY, Elizabeth & child & Mary/ McQUEEN,
Jane/ Magdalen or Pagothow/ MANSEL, Dorothy & Margarite/ MARTIN,
James & Martha & William/ Mekethiva-sister to Jacob/ Metch, Molly/
Miller, Beverly & Margaret/ Mitch/ Molly/ Mouse, Elizabeth/ MYERS,
Frederick.
Nalupua, sister to Molly BIRD/ Neculissika/ Neicheumata/ Netumpsico/
Nosewelamah.
PALMER, Jon/ Pampadour/ Paquwesee/ Peggy/ Peggy, a mullato/ Peter/
Petro, Nicholas & Philip/ PETTERSON, Michael/ Pheby/ Polly/ Polly-not
her real name/ Pouter or Wynima/ PRICE, Hannah & James & Sarah/
PUNNEL, Henry & Peggy.
Rachel/ Red Jacket, Joseph/ RENNOX, Georg/ REYNECK, Peggy/ RHOADS,
Daniel & Michael/ RIDDLE, Jon/ RIGAR, Barbara & Dorothy/ ROSS,
Taverner.
Sally/ Schlyer, Magdalen/ SEA, John & Mary & Peggy & Sally / SEE,
Catherine & George & Mary & Michael/ SHEAVER,Ebenezer & John/
SILKSPINER, Joseph/ Simon/ SIMS, Andrew/ SIVERS, Catherine &
Margarite / SIVERS, Catherine & Elizabeth & Margarite/ SLOVER,
Elizabeth Jr./ SMALLMAN, Thomas/ SMELTZER, Hans Adam & Jacob/ SMITH,
Elizabeth & Hannah & child/ SNODGRASS, Elizabeth/ Sour Mouth/
Sourbach, Hannah Maria/ Sour Plumbs/ SETTLER, Alice/ Stewart, Mary/
STINTSON, Elizabeth/ STROUDMAN, Catherine or Kitty & Uly/ STUDEBAKER,
Joseph.
Tamer-Mulato/ TANNER, Christopher/ Tewanima/ Theecheapei/ TOSHER,
Elizabeth.
VILA, Mary.
WALLACE, Samuel/ WALTER, John/ WALTERS, Ephraim/ WAMPLER, Christina/
Wapatenequa/ Wechquessinah/ WESTBROOK, Catherine or Kitty/ WHEAT,
Thomas/ WHITEHEAD/ WIG, Tommy/ WILKINS, Elizabeth & Mary/ WILLIAMS,
Catherine & David & Jeany & Mary/ WISEMAN, John/ WOOD, Experience.
YOAKIM, Elizabeth/ YOKEHAM, George & Margaret/ YOKIM., Sally/ YOUNG,
Betty & Willliam W/ girl with a Sore Knee.

[This message has been edited by vance hawkins (edited 10-17-2002).]

[This message has been edited by vance hawkins (edited 10-17-2002).]

clen99
10-17-2002, 12:30 PM
vance--it looks like the Tuscarora Valley runs from Port Royal, PA down through western MD and into northern VA. Does it say where these persons were released? They are from the Valley area?

There is also a Tuscarawas Valley in Ohio. Do you know which Valley the text is referring to?

There are many of these surnames on the Shiflet website, but how many might be related at this time I don't know--but these are the names from your post that appear on the Shiflet website also: Bird, Collins, Crow, Greenewood, Harmantrout--we have Armentrout, Leake, Miller, Palmer, Rhoads--we have the surname "Roads", Wood, Fishback, Wiseman, Young, Fisher.

Very interesting stuff! Thanks very much!

[This message has been edited by clen99 (edited 10-17-2002).]

[This message has been edited by clen99 (edited 10-17-2002).]

Linda
10-17-2002, 08:05 PM
Yes, I've seen that spelling of Tuscarawas in Ohio, but could never find any historical link to the Tuscarora. Odd how so many of these captives had Saponi names. Very odd.

vance hawkins
10-19-2002, 11:46 AM
I hope this helps.

I asked the person on the other genealogy site where they got this information and was told it was the French and Indian War.

A long history article was also sent. I'll foreward it here.

I was told it was in Pennsylvania, but it mentions Ft. Loudon which is in Eastern Tennessee.

vance hawkins

vance hawkins
10-19-2002, 11:54 AM
Below is more about the incident -- it seems the British and Indians allies were fighting the French and their Indian allies . . .

This information was made public on another public genealogy board.

===========

Howdy to you too,

Col. Bouquet fought in the French-Indian wars. The Tuscarora valley is located in Pennsylvania. Sent this on, maybe it will give you more help, cuz I'd never heard of Bouquet til I sent the list of captives, lol.

=======================

The Bouquet Expedition

Many books have been written and will be written m the future on the Forbes expedition to drive the French and Indians from eastern Pennsylvania, and much has been written about the effort to build a road in 1758 to the west, then called the Forbes Trail. In actual facts, Forbes was in ill health thus gave authority to Colonel Henry Bouquet to carry out his orders, not only of building a road, but forts along the road. Many believe this road should have been called the Bouquet-Forbes Road.

Not too much has really been stated about Colonel Bouquet and his expedition of 1763-64 for the purpose of forcing a peace or destroying the Indian tribes in Ohio thus bringing to an end their raids, the murders, taking of captives and burning of homes in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia.

Henry Bouquet was born in 1719 in the 'Pays de Vaud’, Switzerland. His parents were aristocrats through marriages in the leading families. At the age of 17, he became a cadet in the Swiss Regiment. By 1744 he had earned the rank of Colonel. He met Benjamin Franklin in France, who filled him with many stories of America, thus he decided to go there. When he landed in America, he found everything so different from his usual life. He began to hate this new land. In 1757 he attained the rank of Colonel. A year later he came to Pennsylvania and was given the opportunity to serve under the command of General Forbes.

In 1763 he was given the opportunity to go into the Ohio territory. In 1765 he was promoted to Brigadier General and then sent to Florida. He became ill with yellow fever and died at Pensacola, September 2, 1765.

Colonel Bouquet in the spring of 1764 was given command of all the British forces in Pennsylvania and other colonies to the south. However, his aim and interest was to strengthen all the forts, with forts Louden, Littleton, Bedford and Ligonier as stepping stones or bases to Fort Pitt where he planned to establish his base for his entry into the Ohio territory. It was necessary to rebuild the Forbes Road bed in many places and in a few cases build new routes over or through the hills and mountains. The forts since 1758 had been left to deteriorate and many of the supplies left in them were ruined by the rats and in many cases carelessness by the army.

Like Forbes, Bouquet began his march from Carlisle August 10 to Fort Loudon to set up a temporary headquarters The first troops arrived at Fort Bedford on September t, 1754 Small forts or redoubts were built at Juniata Crossings and at Stoney Creek. A small earthen works were thrown up at Shawnee cabins.

To find some date about this expedition, it was necessary to refer to the Colonial Archives, the Pennsylvania Archives and the Published Papers of Colonel Henry Bouquet. These volumes contain copies of hundreds of letters written to, and by, Bouquet. We must remember that he had no telephone or radio by which to communicate his orders, thus all his correspondence had to be made by carrier on foot and by horse rider, traveling mile after mile in all hours of the day and night and in all types of weather. From the amount of messages written there must have been close to a hundred men doing this service. A message sent, for example, from Fort Loudon would not reach Fort Pitt until about the 21st, or a message from New York might be received on or about the 26th. One message sent from Fort Loudon on the 30th reached Fort Pitt on the 4th of the next month. Many times the carriers had to take routes unmarked because of roving Indians who were constantly watching the main routes. Their lives were constantly in danger.

In one instance several riders were followed from the top of Laurel Mountain to near Fort Bedford. The next day a soldier was found killed and scalped. The report did not mention if he was a rider.

The reports of the various post commanders to Bouquet contained many problems which they had to solve or were asking his advice on what action to take. Many times the officer expressed his own opinion of what action should be taken.

Captain Simeon Ecuyer at Fort Pitt reported he had arrested a corporal and five of his men for robbing the King's store room. He also suspected several others of stealing ammunition. He suggested there should be four or five hangings to set an example. In another incident a soldier was given a sentence of Boo lashes on the bare back for infraction of military rules.

A complaint was sent from Fort Ligonier that 50,000 pounds of flour was on hand, but about one fourth of it had gone bad, also, the flour that Captain Ourry possessed in Bedford was a better quality. He suggested that Captain Ourry refrain from selling his good flour until he could sell his inferior flour.

Another message was sent by this Captain on February 8 to Bouquet that he had to relieve the entire Bedford detachment because they were accused by Captain Ourry of stealing the King's flour. One thief was given 500 strokes on the bare back. Even then, he refused to name his accomplices. A deserter was given a sentence of 1,000 lashes. He also reported he had sent five men to Fort Cumberland to guard the King's warehouse and the men at Red Stone were deserting daily thus it was necessary to close that garrison. He was having trouble, too, with their flour supply. It was so bad that even the cattle refused to eat it. Several members of the fort owed for supplies and unless they paid their debt within two weeks he intended to sell their possessions. In a later report he said the Shawnee had brought two young boys and two girls, they had previously captured, to the fort. More were expected in the near future.

On May 31, Captain Ourry sent a report that he was preparing the fort in Bedford to provide a haven for settlers in the area in the event of Indian raids. Also, because he had only one Corporal and six men in the fort, he was ordering men from the Juniata Crossing to come to Bedford but leaving one Corporal and one man to attend to the canoe. Furthermore, he had sent a request to Fort Cumberland for additional help. He assured Bouquet he would try to prevent any surprise attack by the Indians. In case of necessity there were 36 men in the town able to bear arms with 19 guns, but little powder. He sent notices to settlers to come to the fort for their safety. Within hours, Ourry sent another message to report that due to the lack of men in the area, the Indians had started their raids and he had been keeping a constant guard at the fort. Furthermore, if and when the troops were sent to Bedford, they must supply their own powder as the trader's supply was exhausted. He had all the inhabitants in the fort saving rain water to quench any flaming Arrows and to make their whiskey a better beverage. He ended his message by writing he wished he could convert all the rats in the store houses into men, he would then not begrudge what they destroyed.

Colonel Bouquet received an urgent report that the 'Ottaway and Chappawa' nations had attacked the fort and English outposts at Detroit and Sandusky. Many were killed and captured. Their plans were to annihilate all the English in the east.

Captain Ourry reported on June 3, that all has been quiet around Bedford, but the settlers had fled from their homes and come to the fort. He had 93 families living within the post and more were expected. A few days later he forwarded another message that he was much concerned about Ligonier and Pitt because all communications between these two points and Bedford had been closed. He had his men build enclosures outside the fort to hold the livestock the settlers had brought with them, also making more room inside to store their other possessions.

Bouquet had been receiving daily reports from other sections of the state. Captain Croghan, from Shippensburg reported that stories had come to him that all settlers in Path Valley had been killed. Later, this report was found to be false, however the people were in constant fear of raids, especially around Fort Littleton. Many Justices were unsuccessful in obtaining volunteers to carry powder and lead to Fort Bedford. A large escort was needed to protect the supplies from capture by the Indians.

Finally on June 16, Captain Ecuyer was able to get a messenger through from Fort Pitt. His fort, he reported, was over crowded and that small pox had broken out, Indians had appeared around the fort attempting to get him to send out patrols to attack them. He was certain they had plans to ambush his men, he mentioned he had placed beaver traps around the fort and hoped he could send him a trap containing a savage's leg in it. A number of 'crow foot had been placed in many paths leading to the fort. These were small iron-three sharp pronged implements that could penetrate the moccasins and feet of the Indians when they stepped on them. They would put the victim out of commission. He further wrote he was expecting a detachment of 30 men from Bedford. The Indians had burned a number of houses in the vicinity of the fort, and four Shawnee warriors had appeared at the gates to tell him the fort was surrounded. They made a number of demands for the evacuation of his fort.

General Jeffrey Amhurst in his headquarters in New York was kept well informed almost daily of the conditions of each outpost. Most of his time was spent in writing messages. He could not see the reason why the various commanders needed to destroy the houses outside their forts just because a few Indians had made their appearances. In fact, he could not accept the fact that they even dared to attack the King's army or the settlers, yet he praised Captain Ourry for the work he had been doing in Bedford and cautioned him not to put too much faith in or trust the Indians.

Croghan, on June 17th, sent a note from Bedford to Bouquet that it is his opinion the Six Nations of New York knew in advance of the plans of the "Dellaway" to join other western nations to attack the English but did not reveal these plans to the whites.

On July 4, 1763, George Wood reported from the Juniata Crossings that the Indians were in all areas in this section. He had at his post 13 men. Captain Ourry had sent five volunteers. The fort was in such poor condition that he had taken the men to his house where repairs had been made to strengthen it so they would be able to defend themselves. He felt it was necessary to keep this post here because it was the only one between Forts Littleton and Bedford. On the same date Bouquet informed Croghan from Carlisle he was making himself answerable for the pay of Captain William Pyper (Piper), his officers and men, and intended to recommend them to the Governor for commissions.

On July 8th, Bouquet advised Governor Hamilton to raise 700 men to act in conjunction with the King's forces. He said he had reports from Captains Ourry, Croghan and Piper about hiring additional men to defend Fort Littleton. He also expected soon to receive "waggons" and flour from Lancaster to go to Bedford. While in Lancaster he received an eight point suggestion to march his men westward. They were to use dogs on leashes. The greater number the more fierce they would be. It was suggested that he use 500 dogs and men, but only a few were to be released at a time to search out swamps and areas where the Indians might be concealed. They could also be used in scouting parties and in the event an Indian was found, the dogs were to be encouraged to rip the body to pieces.

George Wood on July 13, sent a message that on the previous evening two of his men left his house to go along the river in search of deer. A short time later two shots were heard. The men failed to return. He sent an urgent request to Ourry for more reinforcements since they are now in constant danger.

Colonel Bouquet received a report, dated July 11, from Captain James Robertson that he had arrived at Fort Bedford. If the pack horses and sheep had not been so fatigued on the trip he would have arrived a day earlier. They were encamped outside of the town with sufficient security. He also reported that wagons coming west would have considerable difficulty in crossing Sideling Hill because of the poor road conditions.

Additional distressing news came from Major James Livingston at Fort Cumberland. The Indians had made raids in the area, especially within a hundred yards of Colonel Cresap's house and killed several persons. One raiding party was followed up the cove toward Bedford. The other part followed the old warrior path up Wills Creek in the direction of Bedford.

Each post commander had his troubles, not only with the private citizens, but from the enlisted and volunteers. Many of these men were tough. Military discipline was hard to accept. On one occasion a few soldiers before leaving Lancaster had committed a number of horrid crimes. An inquiry was planned when Bouquet reached Bedford.

Obtaining and keeping supplies in the King's store rooms was quite a responsibility. In one instance, the Commissary reported he and an assistant spent three days weighing a new shipment of flour and putting it in other containers. They removed over seven thousand pounds of flour that had arrived over two years before. It had been spoiled by water leaking from the roof of the building. Also seventeen barrels of pork was unfit to use, thus it, too, had to be removed.

Bouquet, from his temporary headquarters at Fort Loudon submitted orders to obtain a contractor to move food supplies for his campaign to the following points: To Fort Pitt 11,400 lbs. of flour, 104,000 Ibs. of meat and 272 bushels of salt. To Ligonier 23,400 lbs. of flour, 20,800 lbs. of meat and 56 bushels of salt. To Bedford 20,800 lbs. of meat and 56 bushels of salt. To Cumberland 12,600 lbs. of flour, 11,200 lbs. of meat and 16 bushels of salt.

He had difficulty in obtaining heavy wagons due to the low payment. He said if he could not obtain them, it would be necessary to obtain over 1,100 horses to pack it over the mountains. He estimated it would require 110 horses to carry this material to Pitt, with an additional hundred horses to carry 500 bushels of forage, 140 horses to Ligonier and 22 horses to carry the salt to Ligonier and Bedford with six additional horses to carry the salt to Fort Cumberland.

Colonel Bouquet received a communication from the Virginia Governor, Francis Fauquier at Williamsburg that a large number of volunteers were being discharged so they could join his campaign. However, a number of these men who were discharged had made sworn depositions stating that one Colonel Lewis had made threats that if they joined Bouquet he would personally see that they would not be paid for their Virginia service. Governor Fauquier said an inquiry would be made into these charges.

Colonel Bouquet ordered Captain James Young, paymaster of the Pennsylvania troops to draw an order of five hundred pounds for expenses of completing the Pennsylvania Regiment, and to pay to Lieutenant John Piper for his expenses.

Additional problems existed. Governor John Penn received reports that many volunteers were deserting, taking with them their baggage, arms and horses. In one instance, they had the impudence of shooting several oxen grazing about the fort. Several men mutinied at Fort Pitt. They received a sentence of 900 lashes on their backs. Several surrendered themselves at Fort Loudon. They had deserted four months previous at Bedford. Soldiers were sent after a number of deserters but they were met with opposition everywhere. A suggestion was forwarded to the Governor that a proclamation be issued to make it a criminal offense to harbor deserters. He also enclosed a long list of names of those who deserted.

Early in July, Captain Grant from Fort Pitt wrote that no Indians had been seen about the fort for several days, but they were pestered by locusts and grasshoppers. They had planted ten thousand cabbage plants with an additional thousand more to be planted later. Corn had not been received from Bedford, but a good supply of oats was received and planted. Everyone was quite busy making hay around the fort. He felt the Indians had moved east because an express rider and four other riders were pursued from Laurel Hill.

Several men outside of Fort Loudon were fired upon and a woman killed and scalped, another was missing. A detachment was sent out in search of the raiders but failed to find them.

A medical officer at Bedford reported on the need of supplies. Also that a Highlander while on duty along the creek, accidentally shot himself in the arm. He first reported an Indian had shot him, however, on further inquiry he revealed that his musket was accidentally discharged through his own carelessness.

July 1, 1764 Lieutenant S. Campbell Carre had been given command of the post of Bedford by Lieutenant Menzies, who previously replaced Captain Ourry. Colonel Reed was ordered to take his soldiers to Fort Pitt in advance of the regular army. He dispatched a runner on August 22 to report he had reached the Brestworks on top of the Allegheny Mountain and that his troops had been fired upon by six Indians. He lost one horse and a hundred pounds of goods. The messenger on his way back, between 'Shaney Cabbins and Callender's house' saw seven Indians with four horses loaded. They were headed toward 'Donnings Creek'. He also found one man killed above Ourry's bridge (Wolfsburg).

Before leaving Fort Bedford, Colonel Reed reported he had been delayed at the fort because of two days rain and the south branch of the Juniata was impassable. His plans were to march his men in columns of two men on each side of the supply wagons and pack horses through the mountains. Members of Brigades 1, 2, 3, 7, 8 and 9 were on the right side while numbers 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12 were on the left. The cattle and sheep would be at the rear under guard of 30 men. Each unit had its orders to follow in the event of a surprise attack. He also mentioned that several of Captain Piper's company had been detained. Furthermore, it was necessary because they were not physically able to make the march, but they could do garrison duties. He mentioned too, that Lieutenant McIntosh and his men had arrived at the fort from Fort Cumberland, and that a large supply of powder was obtained from Mr. Daugherty. He hoped that Captain Ourry would pay for it.

Colonel Bouquet's army reached Fort Bedford Saturday, September 1, 1764. The cattle accompanying the army were kept six miles east of the fort at a place where the stream flows into the Juniata, on the west side of Tussey Mountain. (Note: This would place the fields at what is now known as Alaguippa Gap.)

At the State Council meeting in Philadelphia in July, the Lieutenant Governor proposed that an order be passed to prosecute the Indians with vigor and that premiums be issued to all soldiers for scalps and prisoners. One hundred and fifty Spanish dollars be paid for every male above the age of ten, one hundred and thirty Spanish pieces of eight for every female above the age of ten, one-hundred and thirty four pieces of eight for male scalps and fifty pieces of eight for every female scalp. All Indians of the Six Nations and friendly nations were to be exempted. This bounty was to be especially for Delaware and Shawnee scalps.

Colonel Bouquet and his army moved out of Fort Bedford September 8th, with three days provisions. Each man was provided with 24 rounds of ammunition and a hatchet to be used on an enemy after his musket had been discharged. They arrived at "Shawnee Cabbins" that afternoon. On September 17th they marched into Fort Pitt. It was necessary to make final preparations to proceed into the Indian Territory. From all deductions, we must assume that the Indians had watched every movement of the troops, thus they knew they were now in great danger.

On October l' several Indians came to the fort for the purpose of persuading Bouquet not to enter their towns They tried to impress upon him that his army was so small while their numbers were great. He did not fall for their story. Two days later Captain Jacobs and two other Delaware Chiefs came to the Fort to consult with Bouquet. They said they had met with Lieutenant Bradstreet who had come to the northern part (Ohio) and they signed a peace treaty. The Colonel in no uncertain terms said he heard of this treaty but the tribes had violated it in many ways. They had killed a man near Raystown as well as a number in Virginia, another near the fort where they cut off his head and stuck it on a pole along the path, neither did they return their prisoners nor recall their raiding parties.

He finally consented to give them one more chance. They were to return to their towns at once and tell their tribes of his demands. Failure to do this would mean death to them all. A day or two later several chiefs from the Six Nations came to Fort Pitt to tell Bouquet they were certain the Shawnee and Delaware nations would obey his commands. He told this group that in the event the two nations broke their promises they could expect to be destroyed. He promised not to kill unless they killed first.

Before leaving Fort Pitt, Colonel Bouquet placed Captain David Hay, of the Royal Artillery in command of this post and Fort Ligonier until his return. Among his orders for preparing monthly reports were instructions to give rations daily only to those in his Majesty's service, none—whatsoever to a woman and no one was to enter the storeroom unless accompanied by an officer. When supplies arrived from Fort Loudon, he was to countersign the certificates of delivery and to send the wagons or horses with empty bags back to Fort Loudon. Help was given to the coopers to make the barrels for the salt and salted beef for their winter supply. Also, if he received a shipment of Spelts (a grain similar to wheat and barley) he was to plant several fields for the use next year. The cornfields were to be harvested carefully.

In order to emphasize his demands and see that the captives were surrendered Colonel Bouquet and his army of 1,500 soldiers left Fort Pitt on October 3. They arrived at Tuscarawas on the 13th. He met with the Delaware chiefs on the 14th, but the Shawnee failed to appear. Meetings were held the next three days. Finally the Shawnee came to the council meeting. On this day he gave them all a bitter speech. The renegade, Simon Girty was one of the party of Indians at this meeting.

At the final meeting on the 20th, Bouquet gave the two nations one of the most demanding speeches ever made to an Indian tribe. He listed all the promises they had made and broken. They had killed and taken prisoners forty five days after their treaty with Bradstreet, they killed traders who came to their towns to trade, they killed settlers, including eleven children in a school, and many times bragged they would never make peace with the English. All these charges they knew were true, also with his troops were relatives of some of those they had killed or captured and that he was having a hard time keeping them from killing every Indian.

He finally gave the two nations twelve days to return all captives with no exceptions. He refused to shake their hands or call them brothers. This had a great effect upon them. To make his demands more meaningful, he moved his army 32 miles deeper into their home lands.

The Shawnee really became scared. They were afraid they would be killed, thus, they reasoned they would kill all their captives and then scatter to other tribes. However, Bouquet convinced them that no harm would be done if the captives were given up. By November 9, two hundred and six captives were surrendered to the army. Final peace negotiations were held on the 14th but they were told that all future dealings would have to be made with the King's representative, William Johnson in New York. Each nation was to choose their representatives to meet with Johnson, also to serve as hostages to Bouquet until final peace terms were carried out.

The two hundred and six captives were returned to Fort Pitt on November 28. Bouquet informed the Governor he intended to send the captives to Carlisle, and that he had succeeded in delivering several captives to their families who were at Pitt. He also suggested that setups be taken to have the paymaster available to reimburse the troops for their services and to make plans for their discharge.

When the captives were returned to Carlisle, many parents had difficulty in identifying their children, brothers or sisters. Many husbands and wives were reunited. Many of the children learned to love the Indian way of life that they took the first opportunity to escape and go back to the tribes. (Such an incident took place in the writer's family tree). This page in our history on the return of the captives would fill many volumes.

From the stories we have written, one can see readily the responsibilities the officers had in trying to make this expedition a success. We can also see the importance of the o Forbes road cut in 1757 and 1758 for the lines of communications and shipment of supplies between the forts. Later, this road and the Braddock road would be filled with settlers seeking new homesteads.

If Colonel Henry Bouquet had not made Fort Pitt a stronghold to withstand the Indian raids, the forts at Ligonier, Littleton, Bedford and Loudon would have been captured by the Indians.

techteach
10-19-2002, 06:13 PM
Vance,
I have been researching my ggggrandmother from Beaver County, PA who has a headstone reading Blackfoot (See the Mclane topic). Since she is also identified by the Mormons as Shawnee, I have been exploring online information about PA and Ohio Shawnee. I found these two sites that have information on Bouquet's expedition: http://www.gbl.indiana.edu/archives/miamis15/miamitoc17.html and http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Coshocton/cofile1.htm. I am reading a history from the digital library at the U. of Pittsburgh about Beaver County history that mentions the release of 100 prisoners also. It appears in this source as if they might have been prisoners of Shingiss, a Delaware chief. Here is the Web site if you want it: http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/pitt/viewitem.stable/01hc06126m/v0000/i000/00740030.tif?dpi=4&nav=&frame=frame&main=http%3A%2F%2Fdigital.library.pitt.edu%2Fpitts burgh%2F&ci te=%2Fcgi-bin%2Fpitttext-idx.pl%3Fnotisid%3D01hc06126m%26type%3Dheader&config=pitt&baskurl=%5Bbaskurl%5D&booknotis=01hc06126m&bookid=+Vol.+1+History+of+Beaver+County%2C+Pennsyl vani a+%3A++and+its+centennial+celebration+%2F++by+Jose ph+H.+Bausman+%3B+illustrated.++%0A&Newpage=31.

Cindy

Linda
10-19-2002, 09:51 PM
My Harris line was in Tuscarora Valley, PA!

They turn up on the 1810 census in Chambersburg, PA. The family story is that they were before that in VA. The chances are at least even they were Native, because of their grandson's appearance, Frances Marion Harris. He's the man pictured on this piece I wrote. Other branches of the Harris's have no knowledge of Indian blood, so I'm theorizing there were mixed bloods on both sides of Frances' family, making it more likely so much of the look would show up in him.
http://www.winwinworld.net/Linda/Roots/

His daughter, Emma, my grandmother, said we were Blackfoot. This could also have been on her mom's side, the Hudsons, since I have clues of them being mix blooded too.

On the assumption that Blackfoot indicates Eastern Siouan, or Saponi/Tutelo, there is documentation of Saponi/Tutelo settled in the central part of the state. Path Valley would have been "the path" they would have taken to get there from VA. Anyway, they moved up into there around 1740's.

I've been thinking for awhile that my family had moved into PA just before they show up on the census (1810), but what you've made me realize with what you've shared about Bouquet, is that they could have come up with the 1740's contingent, and what a harrowing experience that would have been, to be a "friendly" tribe in a locale where a fortune (150 spanish dollars sounds like a lot of money) was being paid for Indian scalps.

I wonder how people went about proving what tribe a scalp came from.

Who wrote that piece? Thanks for bringing it here.

vance hawkins
10-21-2002, 11:37 AM
Hi Linda & others,

you asked about documentation.

I guess I forgot to ask or check about the documentation.

hmmm -- It might have given the documentation originally and I might have edited it out. I don't know.

I'll look into it again and get back to ya.

vance

vance hawkins
10-21-2002, 11:40 AM
On the first message -- the list of captives -- this was how it was documented --

=========================

SOURCE: Booth, Russell H. The Tuscarawas Valley.

==========================

At present I assume that is the same source for the history record about the expedition.

vance hawkins

Tom
11-22-2006, 12:47 PM
Our new members need to see this!

rockhound
11-25-2006, 11:48 PM
Thanks for refreshing this...I haven't seen this before...of course, I am interested in Jon Riddle.

PappyDick
11-26-2006, 09:08 AM
Sort of a quibble, but the captives (I believe most had been in Shawnee hands, in Ohio) were returned to Ft. Pitt in Nov. 1764. (Title of this thread says 1765.) The list has been published several times, I believe, in various regional histories. Seems to me there was an annotated version of it that appeared serially, many years ago, in the quarterly journal of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. I may be mistaken about that, it's been a long time since I did any research on this area. More recently, a very nice and well-funded center has been established in memory of Sen. John Heinz, and the collections of this society are housed there. You can search the library collection online at

http://digital.library.pitt.edu/hswp/

This catalog is only searchable for works published in book form, not the contents of manuscripts they hold, journal articles, etc. But, for instance, try topics such as "Bouquet" and "Indian captivities." You will get lots of results, the titles of which may pique the interest of various Saponitown researchers. The "captivities" file includes some from the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries -- not just the ones near Ft. Pitt, that concerned Col. Bouquet in 1764. In the list of Bouquet items see especially those by William Smith, and Bouquet's own published papers.

If you go to Pittsburgh, you can find out much more. Besides the HSWP at the Heinz Center, there is the Carnegie Institute Library; and I believe the Isaac Craig papers at the Univ. of Pittsburgh might be interesting to some, here.

techteach
11-26-2006, 10:15 AM
PappyDick:
Thanks for the information. I searched and what did I find? A story that might include information about my ancestor William Sinkey, who was in the PA eighth in the Rev. But I am frustrated in that I cannot print the full version. Will have to look for it or order a copy.

Techteach

PS: Rockhound - the Bedford County, PA militia had at least one Riddle. Check www.motherbedford.com.

Wachinika
04-15-2007, 09:08 AM
The following was sent to me on another list -- I don't know who Col. Bouquet is/was -- I don't know what event this is talking about even, something that happened in 1765. But it mentions "Tuscarawa's Valley" and I thought that might be in Virginia or North Carolina, so I thought yall might be interested. If any of yall know what event this is talking about, please let me know. I haven't edited any of the message.

My g-g-g-granama was Mary (Polly) Wood, born about 1800, and there is a "John Wood" listed, and her father was named John Wood. He married a Dickson (Dixon?) girl, but we know nothing but their names, about these people. But if the "John Wood" listed is a grown man in 1765, he is too old to have been her father. Maybe they were related, maybe a grandfather or great uncle? I just don't know . . . maybe they are not related at all . . . http://winwinworld.net/SaponiForum/UBB/frown.gif

But maybe someone sees names here that are related to them, so I'm forewarding.

I'll write the person who sent it and ask what it is all about, too.

vance --

==================

Captives Released by Col. Bouquet in 1765

-----------------------------------------

SOURCE: Booth, Russell H. The Tuscarawas Valley.

Names of Captives. If you are related to these captives please
contact Debbie to add your story to the Surname Index.


----------------------------------

Anna Catherine
BABSON, Mordicai/ BACON, Catherine/ BASKIN, Peggy/ BEATY, James/
BELL, James/ Betty/ Betty-black eyes/ BIRD, Margaret/ BIRD, Molly/
Bittikanety/ BLANKENSHIP, Stephen/ BONNET, Henry/ BOYD, Sarah &
Thomas/ BRIDGETs, Son/ BRYAN, Rebecca/ BURD, John/ BUTLER, James or
Jemmy BUTTLER.
CAMPBELL, James & Mary/ CARPENTER, Jerry & Solomon/ CARTMILL, Molly &
Peggy/ CASTLE,Mary/ Cawacawachi/ Christina/ CLANDINNON, Jean/ Clark,
And/ CLAUSSER, Betty & Magdalen & Mary/ Clem, ? & Ludovich/ COBBLE,
Michael/ COCHRAN, John/ COLLEY, Peggy/ COLLINS, Thomas/ Conogoniony/
COON, Elizabeth & two children/ COUNSMAN, Elizabeth/ CRAVEN, Mary/
Crooked Legs/ CROW, Jane & Polly/ CUNINGHAM, Marg.
David bighead/ DAVID, Will/ DAVISON, Agnus, Molly & Nancy/ DEVINE,
Morice/ DIVER, Hans & John/ DONOHOO, John or John Donehoo/ Dorothy's
Son.
Ebenezer/ EWINS, John/ FINCHER, Rachell/ FINLEY, Ann/ FISHBACK,
Margaret & Susan/ FISHER, John/ Flat nose/ FLAUGHTERY, Esther/
FORSYTH, John/ FRANSE, Elizabeth/ FREELING, John & Peggy/ FULKISON,
Elizabeth.
GIBSON, Sarah/ GILMORE, Elizabeth & Elizabeth Jr. & Jane & John/
GORE, Rose/ GREENWOOD, Mary.
HAIG, John/ HAMILTON, Arch & Mary & Miriam/ Hannah/ HANNEL, Mary/
Hans/ HARMANTROUT, Charl & Christopher/ HARPER, Eve & Thomas/ HARRIS,
James/ HEAT, Catherine/ Henry/ Henry, Elizabeth/ HOUSE, Christina/
HUNTZMAN, Adam & Barbara & John/ HUTCHINSON, Florence & David/ HYERD,
Leonard.
ICE, Catherine & Christian & Elizabeth & Eve & John & Lewis & Thomas
& William/ INNIS, Francis & Jenny/ Irena.
Jacob/ James or Jemmy/ Jean or Ketakatwitche/ JOHNSON, David/ Joseph
or Pechyloothammo.
Ketty, Kincake, Eleonard & 2 children, Kitty, Knox, Jane & Mary &
Robert & Susan & Susan Jr.
LANSISCO, Mary & child/ LEAKE, Hans & William/ LEGENFIELD, Mary
Catherine/ LE ROY, John Jacob/ LINENGER, Margareta & Rachel/
LINGERFIELD, Catherine/ Louaveska/ LOWRY, Jane & Mary.
McCORD, Mary/ McCULLOUGH/ McILROY, Elizabeth & child & Mary/ McQUEEN,
Jane/ Magdalen or Pagothow/ MANSEL, Dorothy & Margarite/ MARTIN,
James & Martha & William/ Mekethiva-sister to Jacob/ Metch, Molly/
Miller, Beverly & Margaret/ Mitch/ Molly/ Mouse, Elizabeth/ MYERS,
Frederick.
Nalupua, sister to Molly BIRD/ Neculissika/ Neicheumata/ Netumpsico/
Nosewelamah.
PALMER, Jon/ Pampadour/ Paquwesee/ Peggy/ Peggy, a mullato/ Peter/
Petro, Nicholas & Philip/ PETTERSON, Michael/ Pheby/ Polly/ Polly-not
her real name/ Pouter or Wynima/ PRICE, Hannah & James & Sarah/
PUNNEL, Henry & Peggy.
Rachel/ Red Jacket, Joseph/ RENNOX, Georg/ REYNECK, Peggy/ RHOADS,
Daniel & Michael/ RIDDLE, Jon/ RIGAR, Barbara & Dorothy/ ROSS,
Taverner.
Sally/ Schlyer, Magdalen/ SEA, John & Mary & Peggy & Sally / SEE,
Catherine & George & Mary & Michael/ SHEAVER,Ebenezer & John/
SILKSPINER, Joseph/ Simon/ SIMS, Andrew/ SIVERS, Catherine &
Margarite / SIVERS, Catherine & Elizabeth & Margarite/ SLOVER,
Elizabeth Jr./ SMALLMAN, Thomas/ SMELTZER, Hans Adam & Jacob/ SMITH,
Elizabeth & Hannah & child/ SNODGRASS, Elizabeth/ Sour Mouth/
Sourbach, Hannah Maria/ Sour Plumbs/ SETTLER, Alice/ Stewart, Mary/
STINTSON, Elizabeth/ STROUDMAN, Catherine or Kitty & Uly/ STUDEBAKER,
Joseph.
Tamer-Mulato/ TANNER, Christopher/ Tewanima/ Theecheapei/ TOSHER,
Elizabeth.
VILA, Mary.
WALLACE, Samuel/ WALTER, John/ WALTERS, Ephraim/ WAMPLER, Christina/
Wapatenequa/ Wechquessinah/ WESTBROOK, Catherine or Kitty/ WHEAT,
Thomas/ WHITEHEAD/ WIG, Tommy/ WILKINS, Elizabeth & Mary/ WILLIAMS,
Catherine & David & Jeany & Mary/ WISEMAN, John/ WOOD, Experience.
YOAKIM, Elizabeth/ YOKEHAM, George & Margaret/ YOKIM., Sally/ YOUNG,
Betty & Willliam W/ girl with a Sore Knee.

[This message has been edited by vance hawkins (edited 10-17-2002).]

[This message has been edited by vance hawkins (edited 10-17-2002).]

I came upon this most important page that I'd missed before somehow this morning in a Google search.

beeleaf
04-17-2007, 10:55 AM
Cool & thanks. I googled and came up with at least a partial list of locations for these folks:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~wvhardy/tgart3.htm

Wachinika
04-17-2007, 01:40 PM
Wow beeleaf, great progress is made when we work together. Can you recall what words you used and where you entered them (under 'words' or 'exact phrase' etc.?)

Tom
04-18-2007, 11:32 AM
Of particular interest on this thread is the "Donohoo" last anme, there may be a connection between that last name and a Chief Danapaha from the Saura people.
This line weaves between the Cherokees and eastern Siouan people!

beeleaf
04-18-2007, 03:43 PM
Wachinika, I retraced my tracks and found that I googled "Collins Col. Bouquet in 1765".

Wachinika
04-19-2007, 09:10 PM
Re: Danapaha. You know paha is hill in Lakota and Omaha. I don't know what Dana or maybe Tana would be.